What Are We Accomplishing?

February 21, 2011

Yesterday, during the morning worship service, I learned of Said Musa, an Afghan man facing execution by his government. His “crime”? Apostasy—Musa converted from Islam to Christianity about eight years ago. You can learn more through the Christian Post and National Review (and if you have registered with Wall Street Journal Online, an article here), but basically, Musa was arrested in 2010 after being seen in a video of a Christian worship service in Afghanistan. Even in the face of death, he has refused to recant his faith.

In the National Review article, Paul Marshall makes a probing observation:

Read the rest of this entry »

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How Not to Make Law

July 7, 2009

Progressively more information is coming out about the climate bill recently passed by the U.S. House of Representatives. Whatever you think of the underlying issues, this is not the way to set wise, appropriate policy. Paul Greenberg has written a humorous, yet serious, critique of the process, which he begins this way:

Here’s how to get a dubious bill into law, or at least past the U.S. House of Representatives, which of late has deserved to be called the lower chamber:

First, make the bill long. Very long. So long no one may actually read it, supporters or opponents. Introduce a 310-page horse-choker of an amendment at 3 in the morning on the day of the roll-call vote. So it can’t be examined too closely or too long. Only after the bill passes may its true costs emerge. To cite an old proverb I just made up: Pass in haste, repent at leisure.

You can read the entire article here. Read it! Then contact your representative and senators and petition for the redress of grievances.


Marriage, Family, and No-Fault Divorce

July 3, 2009

Marriage is important. Family is important.  Many of us accept this as a matter of principle, believing that God chose this and built it into His creation.  Believe it for that reason or not, however, we can accept this for practical and experiential reasons, seeing the impact of marriage and family—and the breakup of marriage and family—on our society.

Law affects marriage and family significantly. I could write more on this, but instead I wish to direct your attention to something written by Leah Ward Sears, recently Chief Justice of the Georgia Supreme Court. Through both personal and legal experience, she has seen the effect of no-fault divorce laws on marriage and family. Her article, Let’s End Disposable Marriage, is worth your time. I hope that you will take a few minutes to read it.